Real Estate

Manufactured Homes to Ease Housing Shortages?

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 5, 2018 - 1:00am

The federal government may increasingly be eyeing manufactured housing as one potential solution to ease shortages of affordable homes across the...

Categories: Real Estate

Freddie Still Bullish on New-Home Sales

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 5, 2018 - 1:00am

New-home sales may have started the new year by softening, but that hasn’t made Freddie Mac economists lose their optimism that the sector...

Categories: Real Estate

The Nation’s Fastest-Gentrifying ZIP Codes

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 5, 2018 - 1:00am

Find out which ZIPs are seeing the biggest run-up in home prices, household incomes, and level of residents with higher education over the past 16...

Categories: Real Estate

Howard Hanna Touts Record Year

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 5, 2018 - 1:00am

The third largest real estate company in the U.S. saw its business surge in 2017 to a record-breaking year. 

Categories: Real Estate

Sinkholes: Avoiding Collapsed Transactions

RisMedia Consumer News - March 4, 2018 - 2:06pm

In 2017, multiple regions were severely impacted by natural disasters—and the real estate industry has been affected by them all. But one event which often occurs across the U.S. has largely been out of the limelight.

Sinkhole activity typically occurs in areas of Florida, Texas, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee and Pennsylvania, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. These events take with them land surfaces, which oftentimes include homes, when rock in the underground space dissolves and creates an unsupported cavern, ultimately giving way and collapsing.

The recent resurgence of sinkholes in Florida is leaving homeowners with questions. Are there signs to look for? Can they be prevented? What if a home is destroyed during the selling process? There are steps that homeowners can take to protect themselves and their assets in the case of sinkholes.

Seek Out the Signs
Does the property have noticeable sinking, sagging or cracking walls? These are all tell-tale signs of a sinkhole, according to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Lou Nimkoff, president of the Orlando Regional REALTOR® Association, tells RISMedia. provides even more signs to look for, which can vary depending on the severity of the situation:

  • Tilting or falling trees or fence posts
  • Slanting foundations
  • Sudden pond drainage
  • Wilted vegetation in a specific area
  • The sudden appearance of earthy odors
  • Infestation of bugs, such as slugs and centipedes

Homeowners should also look out for holes or depressions in which surface or storm water disappears. If a vortex emerges through which stream or pond water swirls down, this is another sign of a sinkhole.

Evaluate the Property
If a sinkhole is thought to be present, homeowners must act quickly to have the home inspected. The first step is to report it to the state’s department of environmental protection. If the property is on the market, the buyer can request that the home be inspected by a geotechnical engineer.

“An evaluation by a geotechnical engineering company (often done in concert with the homeowner’s property insurance company) will provide recommendations regarding safety and options for repair,” says Nimkoff.

Manage a Sinkhole-Impacted Transaction
Both buyers and sellers will be affected if the property in question is in danger of being damaged by a sinkhole. To ensure clients are protected, real estate agents should recommend they hire attorneys with sinkhole experience.

“Buyers whose under-contract property becomes involved in a sinkhole should turn to their REALTOR® for a referral to a real estate attorney,” Nimkoff says. “Options for the buyers moving forward (cancellation or renegotiation of the contract; reimbursement or withholding of escrow) are subject to legal interpretation of the contracts and the language contained therein.”

If the sinkhole is discovered before the home goes on the market, both homeowners and real estate agents must follow local real estate disclosure laws. In Florida, the sinkhole must be fully disclosed using the appropriate forms.

“Sellers and their REALTORS® are required by Florida law to disclose the presence of a sinkhole; REALTORS® are further obligated to disclose by the REALTOR® Code of Ethics,” says Nimkoff.

Buyers wishing to walk away from a sinkhole property may be protected depending on the type of contract they sign. These contracts can vary by location and by attorney.

“Buyers whose accepted purchase contract includes an option to cancel pending satisfactory inspection results (or a maximum estimated repair amount) will most likely be able to walk away without losing their escrow,” Nimkoff says. “However, those buyers who utilized other types of contracts (such as an AS-IS) or who included minimal contingencies and wish to cancel the contract should consult with a real estate attorney.”

Remediate the Sinkhole
The good news is a sinkhole can be remediated if it is discovered before its collapse. The process varies depending on the severity of the sinkhole. Shallow, isolated sinkholes are typically repaired through excavation and the installation of a plug. If the sinkhole is deep, however, geotechnical contractors need to use special drilling equipment in order to fix the sinkhole without disrupting it. Some companies install injection pipes in which grout creates a concrete cap.

Of course, remediation does not always translate into a cooperative buyer. Sinkholes can be a deal-killer; however, a property should be remediated in any case to ensure the safety of the homeowner and their property. Insurance also plays a role, as added coverage may be required by the state once a sinkhole is discovered and remediated.

“The decision of whether or not to move forward on a property involved in a sinkhole is dependent on many factors that are personal to each buyer’s intent, the type of property, and the type and age of the sinkhole,” says Nimkoff. “Buyers should rely on their REALTORS® to guide them through all the things to consider as they make a decision.”

The best thing buyers and sellers can do is to become knowledgeable of which areas are more prone to sinkholes. While unpredictable, sinkholes have an easier time forming on specific land.

“According to the Florida Department of Environmental Projection, the entire state of Florida is made up of underground terrain (carbonate rock) in which sinkhole-forming processes are continually taking place, and there is no way to predict the formation of a sinkhole; however, there are definite regions where sinkhole risk is considerably higher,” says Nimkoff. “In general, areas of the state where limestone is close to surface or areas with deeper limestone—but with a conducive configuration of water table elevation, stratigraphy and aquifer characteristics—have increased sinkhole activity.”

Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark

The post Sinkholes: Avoiding Collapsed Transactions appeared first on RISMedia.

Categories: Real Estate

4 Ways to Prepare for a Competitive Spring Home-Buying Season

RisMedia Buying 101 - March 4, 2018 - 2:05pm

(TNS)—With housing inventory far lower than demand and mortgage rates poised to rise, it’s going to be a competitive market for homebuyers this spring.

If you’re looking to buy a home this season, here’s how to prepare yourself to enter the fray. 

Get your financial house in order.
Unless you plan on paying for the house in cash, you’ll need to apply for a mortgage. No matter how streamlined the process is, you’ll still need to gather a significant amount of documentation to give an accurate financial picture to the lender.

Before you even begin house shopping, look at your credit report to make sure there are no errors that could affect your score. Also, pay off any delinquent bills and reduce any other debts you owe so that your debt-to-income ratio (DTI) is favorable. Use a calculator to figure out your DTI and see if you need to make changes. Your goal is to look as attractive to lenders as possible so that you are you approved and can get the best rate on a loan.

Make sure you’ll qualify for a mortgage.
In order to get a mortgage, lenders want to know you’ll be able to meet your monthly obligations no matter what. This means they’ll ask to see your entire financial situation including employment history, salary, savings, investments, debts and anything else that makes up your net worth. Use a prequalifying mortgage calculator to get an idea of what size loan is right for your needs.

Even if you think you’re a strong candidate, never assume you’ll automatically qualify with the first lender you contact. Lenders’ guidelines have become stricter since the housing crisis of 2008, and you could lose out on the house you want if you can’t close on a loan. “Sometimes one deficiency can be offset by another strength. For example, if you have a higher DTI ratio, saving up enough to put a bigger down payment can help,” says Bill Banfield, executive vice president of Capital Markets for Quicken Loans. 

Choose the right REALTOR®.
Unless you’re a seasoned pro, having a REALTOR® on your side can make a big difference.

“An experienced agent will know what could happen that might make a deal fall apart and how to keep that from happening,” says Dori Summer, a real estate agent with Keller Williams Realty in Coral Springs, Fla.

Making an offer on a house in a competitive market can require more than just a willingness to pay the price. If a seller has to choose between multiple buyers, they’re likely to choose the one that’s coming to them with the best overall package. A good agent will present your offer along with other information, including your ability to get a loan, how much you’re able to put down and anything else that might make you more appealing than someone else vying for the same property.

Be prepared to pay the price.
Home prices in close to two-thirds of the housing market are at an all-time high, according to a February 2018 report by the National Association of REALTORS®.

“Sellers in this current market get at least 95 percent of their asking price,” says Samona Rosenberg, a licensed real estate agent with Stein Posner Real Estate Services in Boca Raton, Fla.

If you see the house you want and you know it’s in your budget, it may not make sense to hold out to see if the price will drop.

“The best properties all have multiple offers,” says Erik Williams, a REALTOR® with Keller Williams Realty in Cambridge, Mass. “If it’s a desirable property, it’s desirable to buyers. The people that I see get places under agreement are the most prepared people and the most aggressive.”

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark

The post 4 Ways to Prepare for a Competitive Spring Home-Buying Season appeared first on RISMedia.

Categories: Real Estate

Robots Suit Up for Bigger Roles in Real Estate

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 2, 2018 - 1:00am

Companies touting robotic technology for real estate are seeing explosive growth as the industry begins to embrace the idea of turning certain...

Categories: Real Estate

More Buyers Are Bidding Up Prices

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 2, 2018 - 1:00am

Consequently, sellers are pocketing more than what they’re asking for in a home transaction.

Categories: Real Estate

Mortgage Rates Just Got Higher Again

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 2, 2018 - 1:00am

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage has been on a tear in 2018, climbing 48 basis points since the start of the year.

Categories: Real Estate

Show the Benefits of Staging a Vacant Home

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 2, 2018 - 1:00am

Having a tough time convincing sellers that staging a vacant home is worth it? Here are four compelling reasons you can share.

Categories: Real Estate

10 Markets Winning From Suburbia Exodus

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 2, 2018 - 1:00am

Home buyers are stretching their searches beyond inventory-starved suburbs and into under-the-radar territory.

Categories: Real Estate

5 Decor Trends That Could Hurt a Sale

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 2, 2018 - 1:00am

Some of the latest design trends may best be avoided for those who plan to sell their home soon.

Categories: Real Estate

HQ2: How the Experts Think Amazon’s Decision Will Shake Out

RisMedia Consumer News - March 1, 2018 - 5:38pm

Since Amazon announced its search for a second headquarters site, experts have speculated on what city will become home to HQ2. In January, the company narrowed down its selections to 20. The area Amazon chooses can expect its economy to surge, and, in the housing market, an influx of new residents.

According to experts recently surveyed by Zillow, Atlanta and Northern Virginia are frontrunners. Twelve of the 85 experts who participated in Zillow’s 2018 Home Price Expectations Survey believe affordability, the availability of land and business-friendly incentives are what make Atlanta a prime spot.

Another 12 experts believe that, though costly, Northern Virginia is ideal for its proximity to Washington, D.C. Eleven others chose Austin, nine chose Raleigh and six chose Denver.

Los Angeles, Miami, Newark and New York are the least likely to be selected, according to the experts, chiefly due to congestion, high home prices and lack of incentives.

Whichever city wins, how Amazon has benefitted Seattle—where its current headquarters is located—could indicate how it will impact HQ2’s market.

“As the experience of Seattle suggests, Amazon will not only directly bring thousands of high-paying jobs to the chosen city, but also has the potential to transform the regional economy,” says Aaron Terrazas, senior economist at Zillow. “The local jobs boom that Amazon’s HQ2 promises will spur demand for the full spectrum of housing types, ranging from urban apartments to suburban single-family homes.

“Atlanta has the benefit of being one of the most affordable markets in the country, and is undergoing an urban renaissance with new public infrastructure providing attractive opportunities for employers seeking to lure young urbanites,” Terrazas says. “Northern Virginia has its benefits, as well, as it’s close to a highly educated workforce and a well-developed public transit infrastructure in the D.C. area.”

Amazon’s benefits, however, could come with drawbacks. A boom in the housing market could pressure prices, and more commuters could impact infrastructure.

“The potential economic benefits of hosting Amazon HQ2 are tantalizing, and will tempt the 20 municipalities still in the hunt to dangle significant tax incentives to get a deal done,” says Terry Loebs, founder of Pulsenomics, which conducted the survey with Zillow. “These cities should be prepared not only to justify their financial inducements, but to carefully weigh the social risks and costs that could accompany their HQ2 commitment. The mix and degree of these potential risks, such as diminished affordable housing stock, more congested roadways, and greater income inequality, vary considerably across the 20 markets.”

Amazon announced it would build the headquarters in October. The contenders: Atlanta, Ga.; Austin, Texas; Boston, Mass.; Chicago, Ill.; Columbus, Ohio; Dallas, Texas; Denver, Colo.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Los Angeles, Calif.; Miami, Fla.; Montgomery County, Md.; Nashville, Tenn.; Newark, N.J.; New York, N.Y.; Northern Virginia; Philadelphia, Pa.; Pittsburgh, Pa.; Raleigh, N.C.; Toronto, Canada; and Washington, D.C.

For more information, please visit

Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia’s online news editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark

The post HQ2: How the Experts Think Amazon’s Decision Will Shake Out appeared first on RISMedia.

Categories: Real Estate

March To-Do List for Your Clients

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 1, 2018 - 1:00am

Keep on top of your homeowner game during this seasonal shift with four essential tasks.

Categories: Real Estate

Which Markets Were Hottest in February

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 1, 2018 - 1:00am

Spring may have already sprung in the housing market.

Categories: Real Estate

Most States Return to Peak Prices

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 1, 2018 - 1:00am

Since the doldrums of the Great Recession, some markets have surged beyond prerecession levels while others are still marked in recovery mode....

Categories: Real Estate

This Brokerage Offers a Buy-Back Guarantee

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 1, 2018 - 1:00am

A Southern California real estate brokerage says it will get buyers’ backs with a guarantee of satisfaction this spring, even if it’s...

Categories: Real Estate

10 Cities Relying on Commercial Real Estate

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 1, 2018 - 1:00am

There’s significant economic growth being generated by the commercial housing market on both state and national levels. Find out...

Categories: Real Estate

Are Hispanics Behind Rising Ownership Rates?

NAR Daily News Magazine - March 1, 2018 - 1:00am

A new study predicts that the growing Hispanic population and workforce will help drive growth in the market for decades to come.

Categories: Real Estate

Property Coin: Crypto Investors Looking to Fix and Flip

RisMedia Consumer News - February 28, 2018 - 5:18pm

Is blockchain the future of real estate transactions? So far, only a few contracts have closed through Bitcoin or other forms of cryptocurrency; however, with offerings being introduced, that could quickly change.

Aperture Real Estate Ventures, a real estate technology and investment firm based in Los Angeles, Calif., claims it has launched the first-ever real estate-backed digital currency, Property Coin. Aperture’s model relies on coin proceeds to power its real estate investment business, which focuses on acquiring distressed residential properties and rehabbing them, as well as writing loans to smaller investors who have the same objective.

“Unlike many cryptocurrency offerings, Property Coin’s proposition is straightforward,” said Andrew Jewett, co-CEO of Aperture, in a statement. “One-hundred percent of the net proceeds from sales of Property Coins will be used to invest in properties and loans identified by our proprietary software and our experienced team. Accordingly, Property Coin is designed to be 100-percent backed by real estate assets, giving each coin holder a fractional economic interest in the investments made by Aperture or its affiliates with the net proceeds realized from the sale of Property Coins.”

When buying Property Coins, investors are not only receiving a fractional percentage of assets owned by Property Coin and its entities, but coin holders will also own 50 percent of the net profits from the loan and property investments.

Built on Ethereum—another blockchain-based cryptocurrency not far behind Bitcoin in popularity—Property Coin is completely backed by U.S. real estate assets. Aperture asserts that all investments will be made using the experience of Wall Street and real estate investment professionals while also incorporating industry technology powered by data science.

Property Coin’s public sale began on Feb. 26 for its initial offering at 50 U.S. dollars each, or through the equivalent value of Ethereum or Bitcoin currency. Property Coin purchases are restricted to Accredited Investors who buy at least $1,000 worth of coins.

“We’re very excited to be able to offer this proprietary formula to cryptocurrency investors who want access to a diversified, tech-powered, professionally managed portfolio of real estate assets through Property Coin,” said Matt Miles, co-CEO of Aperture.

Of course, volatility remains an issue with blockchain technology. Aperture is relying on its reinvestment strategy to add token stability and to create renewed interest in the real estate investment market.

Stay tuned to RISMedia for more developments.

Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark

The post Property Coin: Crypto Investors Looking to Fix and Flip appeared first on RISMedia.

Categories: Real Estate

Suburban Realty Professionals  ♦  Princeton Office  ♦  96 Wall Street  ♦  Princeton, NJ 08540  ♦  877-221-8787